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Srimad Bhagavatam (Bhagavata Purana) :: Conto 3a

Victory of Hiranyâksha over All the Directions of the Universe

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Srimad Bhagavatam » Conto 3a   

 Victory of Hiranyâksha over All the Directions of the Universe

(1) Maitreya said: 'When the denizens of heaven heard the explanation of Brahmâ about the cause [of the darkness], they were freed from their fear and next all returned to their heavenly places. (2) Virtuous Diti, apprehensive about the lifelong trouble her husband spoke about in relation to her children, gave birth to twin sons. (3) When they were born, many most frightening, inauspicious signs could be seen in heaven, on earth and in the sky. (4) The mountains and the earth shook with earthquakes and there seemed to be coming fire from all directions with meteors falling, thunderbolts, comets and inauspicious constellations. (5) Sharp winds blew that constantly howled and armies of cyclones with dust-clouds for their ensigns uprooted the greatest trees. (6) Amassing clouds obscured the luminaries with lightning laughing loudly in the sky; everything was enveloped in darkness and nothing could be seen. (7) Stricken with sorrow, the ocean full of agitated creatures wailed with high waves and the drinking places and rivers were disturbed while the lotuses withered. (8) All the time misty halos appeared around the sun and moon who had eclipses, claps of thunder were heard and rattling sounds of chariots resounded from the mountain caves. (9) Inside the villages fearful she-jackals vomited fire from their mouths and there were the cries of owls and the ominous howling of jackals. (10) The dogs raised their heads uttering various cries as if they sang at times and then again were wailing. (11) The asses, o Vidura, loudly braying ran madly hither and thither in groups, striking the earth hard with their hooves. (12) Frightened by the asses the birds flew shrieking from their nests and the cattle passed dung and urine in the cowsheds and the woods. (13) The cows in their fear yielded blood [in stead of milk] and clouds rained pus, the idols shed tears and trees fell down without a blast of wind. (14) The most auspicious planets and the other luminaries stood in conjunction, had retrograde courses or took conflicting positions. (15) Not knowing the secret of all these great omens of evil, except for the sons of Brahmâ all the people who saw more of this were afraid and thought that the world would end. (16) The two godforsaken, earliest Daityas in history grew up quickly, manifesting uncommon bodies that were like steel with the size of mountains. (17) With their brilliant bracelets around their arms and the beauty of the decorated belts around their waists that outshone the sun, the earth shook at every step of their feet while the crests of their helmets touched the sky as they blocked the view in all directions.

(18) Prajâpati Kas'yapa gave the two their names: the one of the twin who was first begotten from his flesh and blood [but was born later] he called Hiranyakas'ipu ['the one feeding on gold'] and the one who appeared first from Diti in the world [but was begotten later] he called Hiranyâksha ['the one with a mind for gold']. (19) Hiranyakas'ipu because of a blessing of Lord Brahmâ being puffed up without any fear that he would be killed by anyone, managed to seize control over the three worlds and their protectors. (20) Hiranyâksha, his beloved younger brother always willing to do him a favor, was, with a club in his hands ready to fight, traversing the higher spheres in search of violent opposition. (21) He had a difficult to control temper, tinkling anklets of gold and the adornment of a very large garland over his shoulders upon which rested his huge mace. (22) Proud as he was of the physical and mental strength conferred by the boon, he feared no one because no one could check him, and therefore the godly afraid of him hid themselves as if they were snakes frightened of Garuda. (23) Discovering that Indra and the demigods seeing his might had vanished and couldn't be found, the chief of the Daityas got excited and roared loudly. (24) Giving up his search the mighty being, wrathful like an elephant just for the sport dove deep into the ocean while producing that terrible sound.

(25) As he entered the ocean, the aquatics, the defenders of Varuna who stayed under water, were beset with fear that he would get hold of them and fled, daunted by his splendor, hurried away as far as they could. (26) Roaming the ocean for many years he with great force time and again struck the mighty, wind-tossed waves with his mace and thus reached Vibhâvarî, o Vidura, the capital of Varuna. (27) There having reached the region of the unenlightened, he, just to make fun, with a smile like a lowborn one bowed before Varuna, the Lord and guardian of the aquatics and said: 'O great Lord, give me battle! (28) You are the guardian of this place, a renown ruler. By your power that reduced the pride of the conceited heroes and with which you conquered all Daityas and Dânavas in the world [viz. the sons of Diti and Daksha's daughter Danu, considered as demons], you once managed to perform a grand royal [râjasûya] sacrifice, o master.'

(29) Thus profoundly being ridiculed by an enemy whose vanity knew no bounds, the respectable lord of the waters got angry, but controlling himself with reason he replied: 'O my best one, we have now left the path of warfare. (30) I can think of no other than the Most Ancient Person who to your satisfaction in battle with you would be sufficiently skilled in the tactics of war, o king of the world. Approach Him who is even praised by heroes like you. (31) Reaching Him o great hero, you will quickly be freed from your pride and lie down on the battlefield amid the dogs. It is for exterminating the evil that you are and to show the virtuous His grace, that He desires to assume His forms.'

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SOURCE: Translation: Anand Aadhar Prabhu, http://bhagavata.org/

Production: the Filognostic Association of The Order of Time, with special thanks to Sakhya Devi Dasi for proofreading and correcting the manuscript. http://theorderoftime.com/info/guests-friends.html

The sourcetexts, illustrations and music to this translation one can find following the links from: http://bhagavata.org/